Logo

Appliances Guide



Refrigerators & Freezers

Refrigerators and freezers are responsible for almost 14 % of the electricity consumption in private households worldwide. About half of this electricity consumption and related greenhouse gas emissions can be saved with the most energy-efficient technologies currently available. This will usually save consumers more money than the price premium on the energy-efficient appliance.

Efficient refrigerators and freezers can save users a lot of energy

Cover

What users can save with energy-efficient refrigerators and freezers

Due to technical progress and energy efficiency policy schemes implemented in most regions, the specific electricity consumption per volume of cold appliances has decreased during recent years. These schemes include mandatory Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) in many countries. Some countries, including the USA and Australia, have already reduced specific electricity consumption per volume by up to 80%. Surprisingly, the purchase price of cold appliances meeting the MEPS has also decreased in these countries, after correction for inflation. Much more can be achieved because the MEPS do not yet reflect the best technically and economically feasible performance. Cold appliances with much better efficiency are available (see pdf file ‚What users can save with energy-efficient refrigerators and freezers’). Energy savings of 20 to 60 % are possible, compared to the most popular conventional appliances. Also, the most efficient appliances worldwide are not yet available in all markets. Appropriate policies can close this efficiency gap. Policy should also support research and development for even more efficient appliances (BNAT). This can be done both by direct financial support and demand-pull strategies, such as technology procurement and super-efficient appliance award competitions. Read more in the bigEE Policy Guide.

Pages: 20
Type: PDF
Size: 386.6 KB
Upload: 2012-12-04
View Document

Cutting world energy use for domestic refrigeration by more than a third

Cover

The overall worldwide saving potential from domestic refrigerators and freezers

Currently about 1,4 billion domestic cold appliances are in use worldwide, using about 650 TWh of electricity and causing Greenhouse gas emissions of 450 Million tons of CO2eq a year. Total energy consumption by cold appliances is still on the increase. However, the most energy-efficient technology domestic cold appliances could reverse this trend despite growing ownership: Compared to 2008, in the order of 360 TWh/yr of electricity could be saved, leading to Greenhouse gas emission reductions of 220 million tons per year, by 2030. See the associated PDF on the potential by world region.

Pages: 40
Type: PDF
Size: 671.9 KB
Upload: 2012-12-04
View Document

How manufacturers can improve the energy efficiency of refrigerators and freezers

Cover

Technical background and design options

Design options exist which would allow further reductions in specific energy consumption compared to the current Best Available Technology (BAT) worldwide. Additional savings in specific energy consumption of about 50 % vs. BAT can be expected, depending on appliance types. These options include improved insulation, more efficient compressors, evaporators, condenser and heat exchanger optimisation and optimised electronic control. However, more research and development is necessary to bring appliances to the market with such technology (BNAT: Best Not (yet) Available Technology). Read more in the pdf file ‚Technical background and design options to raise cold appliance efficiency and to reduce their environmental impact’.

Pages: 23
Type: PDF
Size: 386.5 KB
Upload: 2012-12-04
View Document

Managing demand needs measuring energy efficiency

Cover

Test procedures, measurements and standards for refrigerators and freezers

Consumers can save a lot of energy by choosing energy-efficient refrigerators and freezers whenever they purchase one. They therefore need to be able to compare the annual energy consumption of different models of similar size and function. Test procedures to measure energy consumption and efficiency are therefore crucial for markets and policies to work well. We have collected and compared the test procedures and standard definitions for energy efficiency used in major economies (see pdf file ‚Test procedures, measurements and standards for refrigerators and freezers’).

Pages: 10
Type: PDF
Size: 208.0 KB
Upload: 2012-12-04
View Document

What policy can do and achieve for energy efficiency of refrigerators and freezers

Due to technical progress and energy efficiency policy schemes implemented in most regions, the specific electricity consumption per volume of cold appliances has decreased during recent years. These schemes include mandatory Minimum Energy Performance Standards (MEPS) in many countries. Some countries, including the USA and Australia, have already reduced specific electricity consumption per volume by up to 80%. Surprisingly, the purchase price of cold appliances meeting the MEPS has also decreased in these countries, after correction for inflation.

Much more can be achieved because the MEPS do not yet reflect the best technically and economically feasible performance. Cold appliances with much better efficiency are available (see pdf file ‚What users can save with energy-efficient refrigerators and freezers’). Energy savings of 20 to 60 % are possible, compared to the most popular conventional appliances. Also, the most efficient appliances worldwide are not yet available in all markets. Appropriate policies can close this efficiency gap.

Policy should also support research and development for even more efficient appliances (BNAT). This can be done both by direct financial support and demand-pull strategies, such as technology procurement and super-efficient appliance award competitions.

Read more in the bigEE Policy Guide


Was this page helpful?   66% of our visitors found this helpful.